Online Care May Be As Effective as In-Person Care for Psoriasis

Tuesday, October 09, 2018 | Psoriasis , Research and Publications


Teledermatology may be as effective as seeing a doctor in person when it comes to improving the symptoms of psoriasis, according to a new study in JAMA Network Open.

“Patients with chronic skin diseases need ongoing care, and depending on where they live, their access to dermatological care can be variable,” says the study’s lead author April Armstrong, MD, MPH, professor of dermatology (clinical scholar) and associate dean for clinical research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. “Our study suggests that an online care delivery model is an effective way to bring high-quality care to patients regardless of where they live or what their work/life schedules look like.”

In the multicenter study, Dr. Armstrong and her colleagues followed nearly 300 patients who had been randomized to either online or in-person care and monitored their symptom improvement.

Patients assigned to online care logged in to a secure, web-based connected health platform where they could communicate with their primary care provider or dermatologist, share images of their skin and receive treatment recommendations.

After reviewing transmitted information, health care providers evaluated patients’ progress, provided patient education and prescribed medications electronically. Patients assigned to in-person care received treatment as usual.

Psoriasis severity was measured at baseline and again at three, six, nine and 12 months. Across the follow-up visits, the two groups achieved similar improvement in psoriasis severity scores.

“From a patient’s perspective, there are several benefits to an online care delivery model: They don’t need to travel to a facility with specialty care, they can receive high-quality specialty care at home and they can communicate with their doctor at a time that’s convenient for them,” Dr. Armstrong says. “From a provider’s perspective, the benefits include flexibility in where and when they work.”

While this study focused on patients with psoriasis, Dr. Armstrong believes that the online care model has other potential applications as well.

“The use of teledermatology needs to be considered in other patient populations with chronic skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis. There is a critical need for children and adults with atopic dermatitis to receive high-quality specialist care for this condition through novel telehealth delivery methods,” she says.

 

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