Allergan's TEFLARO® OK'd for Pediatric Patients

May 30, 2016

Allergan’s TEFLARO® (ceftaroline fosamil) is now indicated for pediatric patients, making it the first branded IV antibiotic approved for this population in more than a decade.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the company's supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) allowing the antibiotic to be used in pediatric patients two months of age to less than 18 years of age with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), including infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and other designated susceptible bacteria. It is administered by intravenous (IV) infusion in five minutes to one hour.

These new indications were approved based on results from clinical studies evaluating TEFLARO in pediatric patients including one active-controlled study in ABSSSI and two active-controlled studies in CABP. In the ABSSSI active-controlled study, the efficacy and safety of TEFLARO was compared with vancomycin or cefazolin (each with optional aztreonam). In the CABP studies, TEFLARO was compared with ceftriaxone. Use of TEFLARO in pediatric patients 2 months to less than 18 years of age is supported by evidence from adequate and well-controlled studies of TEFLARO in adults, as well as additional pharmacokinetic and safety data from pediatric trials.

The primary objective of the pediatric ABSSSI and CABP studies was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of TEFLARO. These studies were not powered for comparative inferential efficacy analysis, and no efficacy endpoints were identified as primary.

To evaluate the treatment effect of TEFLARO in the ABSSSI pediatric trial, an analysis was conducted in 159 patients with ABSSSI in the Modified Intent-to-Treat (MITT) population. This analysis evaluated responder rates based on achieving both cessation of lesion spread and absence of fever on Study Day 3. Patients treated with TEFLARO showed a higher response at Study Day 3 versus the comparator group, with clinical response achieved in 80.4 percent (86/107) of patients treated with TEFLARO and 75 percent (39/52) of patients in the comparator group, with a treatment difference of 5.4 percent (95 percent Confidence Interval [CI] -7.8, 20.3). Clinical cure rates at the test of cure (TOC) visit (8 to 15 days after the end of therapy) for the ABSSSI pediatric trial were 94.4 percent (101/107) for patients treated with TEFLARO and 86.5 percent (45/52) for the comparator, with a treatment difference of 7.9 (95 percent CI -1.2, 20.2).

To evaluate the treatment effect of TEFLARO in the CABP trial submitted for this pediatric filing, an analysis was conducted in 143 patients with CABP in the MITT population. This analysis evaluated responder rates at Study Day 4 based on achieving improvement in at least two out of seven symptoms (cough, dyspnea, chest pain, sputum production, chills, feeling of warmth/feverish and exercise intolerance or lethargy), and worsening in none of these symptoms. The clinical response at Study Day 4 was 69.2 percent (74/107) for patients treated with TEFLARO and 66.7 percent (24/36) for the comparator, with a treatment difference of 2.5 percent (95 percent CI -13.9, 20.9). Clinical cure rates at TOC were 87.9 percent (94/107) for patients treated with TEFLARO and 88.9 percent (32/36) for the comparator, with a treatment difference of -1.0 (95 percent CI -11.5, 14.1).

Results from the clinical studies in pediatric patients showed that TEFLARO demonstrated a safety profile that was compatible with treatment of ABSSSI and CABP at the clinical dosages studied. The safety findings were similar to those seen in the adult studies, and no safety concerns were identified beyond those already known to be cephalosporin class effects.  

 

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