“The Impact of Skin Color and Ethnicity on Clinical Diagnosis and Research,” a new webinar series presented by the Skin of Color Society, NEJM Group, and VisualDx launches this month to call attention to health disparities and structural racism in medicine.

The four-part series is intended to delve into longstanding problems in education, research, and patient care as well as introduce ways to improve outcomes in marginalized patients, the organizers say.

Studies have shown patients with darker skin experience worse health outcomes than patients with lighter skin. This free series will address the socioeconomic factors, structural racism, and implicit bias that lead to disparities, as well as look at how the medical community can address these issues by offering tangible, real-world solutions. Each discussion will feature insights from renowned experts, thought leaders and advocates that are driving the industry forward to improve the health and lives of underrepresented populations.

The four-part series will feature the following topics and leading physicians:

  • “Structural Racism and Racial Bias in Medicine,” Wednesday, October 28 at 1 pm ET
  • “Hair Disorders in People of Color,” Thursday, November 12 at 1 pm ET
  • “Pigmentary Disorders and Keloids,” Wednesday, November 18 at 1 pm ET
  • “COVID-19 Comorbidities and Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Diseases in Adults and Children,” Wednesday December 2 at 1 pm ET

 “For 20 years, we have been committed to improving diagnosis and care in patients with skin of color,” says Art Papier, MD, CEO of VisualDx. “We are thrilled to team up with such exemplary partners who share in that commitment. Now is the time to not only talk about racial disparities, but to do something impactful about the problem by equipping our clinicians with the ongoing education, training, and comprehensive information tools needed to improve patient care.”

“Implicit bias and structural racism play a central role in the development of health care disparities. One example is misdiagnosis of skin diseases in patients of color,” says Kathy Charlton, Managing Director of NEJM Group Education and Applied Knowledge. “NEJM Group is pleased to be a part of this collaborative effort with Skin of Color Society and VisualDx to engage and educate clinicians to strive for diagnostic quality and accuracy in patients of color.”

“Founded 16 years ago, the Skin of Color Society’s (SOCS) programs in education, research, and mentoring and SOCS' collaboration with other dermatology societies have significantly increased the numbers of underrepresented minority dermatologists, research grants, publications, and educational opportunities in skin of color dermatology. SOCS welcomes this collaboration with NEJM Group and VisualDx. These webinars exemplify the type of education needed to understand implicit bias and eliminate health disparities in people of color,” says Lynn McKinley-Grant, MD, FAAD, SOCS President.