Study: Bakuchiol-containing Skin Care Regimen Improves Skin Barrier Function Without Disrupting the Microbiome

October 28, 2023
Study Bakuchiolcontaining Skin Care Regimen Improves Skin Barrier Function Without Disrupting the Microbiome image

A Burt’s Bees bakuchiol-containing skin care regimen can help maintain a balanced skin barrier and microbiome in people with sensitive skin.

A Burt’s Bees bakuchiol-containing skin care regimen can help maintain a balanced skin barrier and microbiome in people with sensitive skin, according to research presented at the 2023 Integrative Dermatology Symposium (IDS).

For the study, 45 women aged 35 to 70 years with sensitive skin conditions such as rosacea, eczema and cosmetic intolerance syndrome and mild-moderate aging skin used a cleanser with 0.5% bakuchiol in the morning and evening, a serum with 1.0% bakuchiol in the morning and a moisturizing cream with 1% bakuchiol in the morning and evening.

Researchers measure skin hydration and barrier function/transepidermal water loss to assess the tolerability and efficacy of the skin care regimen along with assessment of the skin microbiome via 16S rRNA analysis.

The bakuchiol-containing skin care regimen improved skin hydration, improved skin moisture barrier function,  improved the overall skin appearance without signs of irritation, and did not disrupt the skin microbiome, the study showed.

“Protecting the skin microbiome is essential as it augments the physical barrier between the skin and the external environment,” says study author Stanley Levy, MD, a dermatologist in Chapel Hill, NC in a news release. “Our study demonstrated the ability of a nature-based skin care regimen to improve skin barrier function without disrupting the skin microbiome, which is particularly important for those with sensitive skin.”

In related Burt’s Bees research presented at the meeting, topical treatment with a unique blend of botanicals from Glycyrrhiza glabra, Curcuma longa, and Terminalia chebula was safe and effective in reducing hyperpigmentation in photodamaged skin among people with diverse skin tones. 

The study included 40 women with moderate age spots and photodamage. A dermatologist-investigator assessed the product efficacy by clinical grading and with skin colorimeter measurements obtained from a target pigmented spot and a corresponding clear site on the face, all performed at baseline, weeks 4, 8, and 12, the researchers concluded.

Topical treatment with Glycyrrhiza glabra, Curcuma longa, and Terminalia chebula was determined to be clinically safe and effective in reducing the appearance of hyperpigmentation in photodamaged skin within a variety of skin types and tones.

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