Cetaphil Launches Initiative to Raise Awareness of Connection Between Clothing and Sensitive Skin

02/16/2023
Cetaphil Launches Initiative to Raise Awareness of Connection Between Clothing and Sensitive Skin image

Cetaphil announced it is launching a new initiative this month that aims to raise awareness of the connection between our clothes and skin. The initiative includes a partnership with Hillary Taymour, designer and founder of fashion house Collina Strada, and board-certified dermatologist at Spring Street Dermatology, Sapna Palep, MD.

"My clothing uses fabrics like recycled cotton and rose sylk, both of which are soft and wearable for all skin types, but especially great for those with sensitive skin. I'm thrilled to partner with Cetaphil to showcase some styles that are great options for sensitive skin, because helping my clients feel both confident in clothing and in their own skin, is always my end goal," Ms. Taymour said in a company news release.

When fabrics interact with skin that has a compromised skin barrier, it can lead to irritated skin or skin conditions such as contact dermatitis or even textile contact dermatitis.[1] During the winter, those with sensitive skin may experience flare ups. This can be due to colder temperatures, wind, low moisture in the air and fluctuating body temperatures, but also the interaction between the skin and certain fabrics, according to Cetaphil.

Skin sensitivity affects approximately 70% of individuals worldwide and this can manifest itself in an array of skin irritations. Also, when skin is dry, it can become more sensitive and prone to react because the skin barrier is interrupted.[2] Cetaphil's formulas are designed to defend against 5 signs of skin sensitivity (dryness, roughness, irritation, tightness and weakened skin barrier).

References

1https://dermnetnz.org/topics/textile-contact-dermatitis

2https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/16940-dry-skin#:~:text=If%20you%20have%20severely%20dry,for%20skin%20swelling%20and%20inflammationhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11882-014-0433-9

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